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Israeli scientists unveil world’s first 3D-printed heart with human tissue

(Photo: JACK GUEZ / AFP)

(Photo: JACK GUEZ / AFP)

By Delphine Matthieussent - April 15, 2019

AFP — Scientists in Israel unveiled a 3D print of a heart with human tissue and vessels on Monday, calling it a first and a “major medical breakthrough” that advances possibilities for transplants.

While it remains a far way off, scientists hope one day to be able to produce hearts suitable for transplant into humans as well as patches to regenerate defective hearts.

The heart produced by researchers at Tel Aviv University is about the size of a rabbit’s.

Read More: Times of Israel

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Israel's EarlySense Tech Chosen To Help Combat Infant Mortality In Kenya

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By Noam Goldberg - April 1, 2019

According to USAID, Sub-Saharan Africa has the world’s highest newborn death rate of 34 per 1,000 births. In 2017, UNICEF estimated 1.04 million neonatal deaths in the region, accounting for nearly a fifth of under-five deaths globally.

In an effort to combat the region’s extreme infant mortality rates, Israeli medical technology company, EarlySense, is deploying its market-leading patient monitoring platform in Nairobi, Kenya.

EarlySense was selected by international nonprofit, Save The Children, to monitor newborns’ vital signs as part of a pilot project supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The company’s contact-free, piezoelectric sensors will be used to measure infants’ respiratory rate, heart rate, and any type of motion, detecting dangers such as rib-cage movement and heart contractions without disturbing or coming into contact with the infant.

Read More: NoCamels

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Second Temple-era settlement unearthed in southern Israel

(Photo: Anat Rasiuk/Israel Antiquities Authority)

(Photo: Anat Rasiuk/Israel Antiquities Authority)

By Naama Barak - April 8, 2019

Israeli archaeologists unearthed the remains of a Jewish settlement of the Second Temple era in the southern Israeli city of Beersheva, revealing evidence of daily Jewish life and even rebellion.

The site of the settlement, which dates from the 1st century CE to the Bar-Kochva Revolt of 135 CE, was uncovered during excavation ahead of the construction of a new neighborhood. It is the first such settlement to be found in the area, which at the time served as the southern border of the ancient kingdom of Judah.

Read More: Israel21c

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Israel just became the seventh nation to orbit the moon

(Photo: Space IL)

(Photo: Space IL)

By Mike Wall, Space.com - April 4, 2019

Israel just became the seventh nation to orbit the moon.

After slowly spiraling away from Earth for the past six weeks, an Israeli spacecraft known as Beresheet slipped into orbit around the moon on Thursday.

This was a historic achievement for the little robot, but it paves the way for something truly epic: a lunar touchdown attempt a week from now. If Beresheet succeeds on April 11, it will become the first Israeli craft, and the first privately funded vehicle, ever to land on the surface of the moon.

"The lunar capture is an historic event in and of itself — but it also joins Israel in a seven-nation club that has entered the moon’s orbit," Morris Kahn said in a statement. "A week from today, we'll make more history by landing on the moon, joining three superpowers who have done so. Today I am proud to be an Israeli."

Kahn chairs SpaceIL, the nonprofit organization that runs Beresheet's mission along with Israel Aerospace Industries, the nation's largest aerospace and defense contractor.

Read More: NBC News

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Rare ancient treasures bearing Biblical names discovered in Jerusalem’s City of David

(Photo: Eliyahu Yanai, City of David)

(Photo: Eliyahu Yanai, City of David)

By James Rogers - April 2, 2019

Archaeologists in Israel have discovered a rare clay seal mark and a 2,600-year-old stone stamp bearing Biblical names amid the ruins of a building destroyed by the ancient Babylonians.

The amazing finds, which date to the First Temple period, were made in Jerusalem’s famous City of David. The artifacts were discovered in the remains of a structure razed in the 6th century B.C., likely during the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem in 586 B.C., according to experts.

In a statement, Prof. Yuval Gadot of Tel Aviv University and the Israel Antiquities Authority, which oversaw the dig, said charred pottery shards were found in the building, indicating that the seal mark and stamp survived a major fire. Both artifacts feature ancient Hebrew script.

Read More: Fox News

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Why Israeli research is such a hot ticket worldwide

(Photo: Shitzu Photographers/Technion Spokesperson’s Office)

(Photo: Shitzu Photographers/Technion Spokesperson’s Office)

By Abigail Klein Leichman - March 31, 2019

Research from Israel is driving awesome advances in medicine, healthcare, water management, autonomous vehicles, consumer products, manufacturing, and – well, you name it.

So it’s only natural that many international academic, corporate and government bodies are signing collaboration agreements with Israeli research universities and hospitals.

Nanotechnology is one of the hot fields of shared interest, for application in everything from cancer drug delivery to finding dark matter in outer space.

Israeli physicist Beena Kalisky from Bar-Ilan University’s Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA) is leading a team of researchers in France, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and Sweden in developing a desktop-sized quantum computer.

BINA recently inked research and cooperation deals with the United Nations International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory in Portugal; the University of Jyväskylä in Finland; State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemicals, Fibers & Polymer Materials at Donghua University in Shanghai, and Hanyang University in Seoul.

“Israel offers a combination of good research and good conditions for partners, and that attracts entities to us,” says BINA Director Prof. Dror Fixler, also a member of the Bar-Ilan Faculty of Engineering and a new fellow of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE).

Read More: Israel21c

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Israeli tech provides drinking water to Sierra Leone kids

(Photo: Drusso/Shtevi Photography)

(Photo: Drusso/Shtevi Photography)

By Abigail Klein Leichman - March 31, 2019

Water pollution is one of the leading causes of death in the west African country of Sierra Leone, where average life expectancy is just 56 years. Now, St. Joseph School girls in the capital city of Freetown can easily access safe drinking water thanks to Israeli technology in the form of an atmospheric water generator from Watergen.

The GEN-350 can produce up to 900 liters of water per day from the humid air of Africa. The atmospheric moisture is purified through an internal water-treatment system. The unit needs no infrastructure except electricity from the power grid or from a generator.

Watergen President Michael Mirilashvili’s efforts to make fresh, pure water available around the globe earned the company a place on the World Economic Forum’s list of the world’s top technology pioneers in 2018.

Based in Rishon LeTzion, the company was founded in 2009 by entrepreneur Arye Kohavi and maintains two factories in Israel. Miami-based Watergen USA has a factory in South Carolina.

Read More: Israel21c

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Rare photo series marks Israel-Egypt peace treaty at 40

(Photo: Dan Hadani - Dan Hadani Archive/National Library of Israel)

(Photo: Dan Hadani - Dan Hadani Archive/National Library of Israel)

By Rachel Neiman - March 26, 2019

March 26, 2019 marks the fourth decade since the signing of the 1979 Israeli-Egyptian Peace Treaty. It is a bittersweet anniversary. Relations between Israel and Egypt have long been described as a “cold peace” with little person-to-person contact – so different from the euphoria of the early Eighties when Israelis rushed en masse to visit the country that had once been a bitter enemy.

That spirit was perhaps best exemplified by the two leaders at that time, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar el-Sadat, who – in addition to sharing the 1978 Nobel Prize for Peace – shared a friendship that extended beyond the confines of formal diplomacy.

In honor of the 40th anniversary, the National Library of Israel has released a series of photographs documenting Begin’s visits to Egypt.

During the negotiations with Egypt and in the years following the signing of the agreement, Begin came to Egypt several times. Betwixt and between the crowded meeting schedule, the Israeli PM managed to tour some of Egypt’s most famous historic sites: the Pyramids of Giza, the Aswan Dam, the temples of Abu Simbel and the tombs of the Pharaohs in the Valley of the Kings.

According to photographer Dan Hadani, who accompanied the Israeli entourage on one visit, “It was impossible to describe the excitement that gripped us when we suddenly saw the pyramids from the plane. To think of the Children of Israel who were slaves in Egypt… it was like a dream.”

Read More: Israel21c

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IsraAID sends emergency team to cyclone-swept Mozambique

(Photo: World Food Programme)

(Photo: World Food Programme)

By Naama Barak - March 20, 2019

Israeli humanitarian NGO IsraAID is dispatching an emergency response team to Mozambique, after it was hit by the devastating Cyclone Idai, thought to be the worst ever disaster to strike the southern hemisphere, according to the United Nations.

The cyclone, which swept through Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe in southeastern Africa, destroyed everything in its path, leaving homes, crops and infrastructure in ruins, and fears that over 1,000 people will have died in the tragedy.

More than 2.6 million people across the three countries are thought to be affected by the powerful storm. Mozambique’s port city of Beira, the country’s fourth largest, took a direct hit from the cyclone leaving it 90 percent destroyed and almost completely cut off by storm surges of 18 feet.

IsraAID is set to distribute relief supplies, deliver psychological first aid and restore access to safe drinking water to affected communities in Mozambique.

Read More: Israel21c

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An exhibit in South Africa recalls the exodus of Ethiopian Jews to Israel

(Photo: Beit Hatfusot/via JTA)

(Photo: Beit Hatfusot/via JTA)

By Moira Schneider - March 16, 2019

CAPE TOWN (JTA) — In 1983, when Danny Abebe was 9 years old, his Jewish family decided one Rosh Hashanah night to leave their remote village in Ethiopia — with some 700 others — due to war and a series of famines that had wracked the country.

“We didn’t know where [we were going], nobody told us,” he recalled. “We walked barefoot to Sudan – we walked 800 kilometers [500 miles], over three weeks, walking 45-55 kilometers a day,” or between 28 and 35 miles.

Abebe didn’t know it then, but he was part of the historic Operation Moses, the secret airlift by the Israeli government of some 7,000 Ethiopian Jews to Israel over seven weeks between 1984 and 1985. At the opening of “Operation Moses: 30 Years After,” an exhibition at the South African Jewish Museum that showcases the stories of 10 such individuals — he spoke of the heartbreak faced along the way.

Gavin Morris, director of the South African Jewish Museum, said an important element of the exhibition is that it acknowledges the Jewish presence in Africa over two millennia.

“There’s a tendency to think of Jews in this day and age as white, middle- or upper-class people, where the reality historically has always been very different,” Morris told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.

“We bring a lot of African schoolchildren through the museum – I’d like them to see that Jews are not homogenously white, Ashkenazi, middle-class people, but that we are a very diverse culture and community and the lived experience of the Ethiopian Jews is much closer to their known experience and is maybe something that would resonate a bit more closely,” said Morris.

Read More: Times of Israel

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'A Real Blessing': Archaeologists Unearth Rare 1,700 Year Inscription on Church in Israeli Desert

(Photo: Tali Erickson-Gini, IAA)

(Photo: Tali Erickson-Gini, IAA)

By Emily Jones - March 14, 2019

JERUSALEM, Israel – German and Israeli scientists discovered a 1700-year-old stone bearing the name of a city believed to be the possible location of an ancient biblical town.

The Greek inscription refers to the city of Elusa (Halutza in Hebrew) and was discovered during excavations in Halutza National Park in the Negev desert.

"The name of the city of Elusa appears in a number of historical documents and contexts, including the Madaba mosaic map, the Nessana papyri and other historical references. However, this is the first time that the name of the city has been discovered in the site itself. The inscription mentions several Caesars of the tetrarchy which allow to date it around 300 CE," the Israel Antiquities Authority said Wednesday in a press release.

Read More: CBN

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App brings ridesharing to women in Arab-Israeli villages

(Photo: Technion Spokesperson's Office)

(Photo: Technion Spokesperson's Office)

By Brian Blum - March 12, 2019

One of the most significant barriers to integration of Arab-Israeli women into the job market, as well as greater involvement in the public arena, is transportation. Bus service from Arab villages in the north of Israel is sporadic at best.

Catching a ride with a stranger is also a non-starter. A survey conducted by researchers at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology with 117 women from 10 communities in the northern part of the country found that most participants said that, for personal security concerns, they would only feel comfortable traveling with drivers with whom they are familiar.

To address both these concerns, the Technion’s Transportation Research Institute and Kayan, a feminist nonprofit organization, have developed Safarcon (Arabic for “your travels”), a new ridesharing application built specifically for women in the Arab-Israeli sector. Safarcon has the support of the Office of the Chief Scientist at the Ministry of Transportation.

The Arabic-language Safarcon is free to users; it connects drivers with passengers who need to reach the same destination.

Read More: Israel21c

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Israel's first moon mission spacecraft sends back selfie

(Photo: AFP/Getty)

(Photo: AFP/Getty)

By Agence France-Presse - March 5, 2019

An Israeli spacecraft on its maiden mission to the moon has sent its first selfie back to Earth, mission chiefs said on Tuesday.

The image showing part of the Beresheet spacecraft with Earth in the background was beamed to mission control in Yehud, Israel – 23,360 miles (37,600km) away, the project’s lead partners said.

The partners, NGO SpaceIL and state-owned Israel Aerospace Industries, launched the unmanned Beresheet – Hebrew for Genesis – from Cape Canaveral in Florida on 22 February.

Read More: The Guardian

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Israel’s medical clowns are on a mission to heal the world

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By Abigail Klein Leichman - March 3, 2019

Israel Defense Forces medical missions always fly to disaster zones with tons of medical equipment. For David “Dush” Barashi, the most critical piece of equipment is his red nose.

A veteran member of Israel’s Dream Doctors Project, Barashi and fellow medical clowns take the skills they hone daily in Israeli hospitals and apply them at scenes of indescribable despair, death and destruction across the world.

Over the past 16 years, in addition to his day job at Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem, Barashi has tended patients and/or trained personnel in about 50 hospitals in Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Philippines, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, India, Australia, United States, England, Bulgaria and France.

Read More: Israel21c

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Why Forbes chose Israel to host 1st Global Women’s Summit

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By Abigail Klein Leichman - February 21, 2019

For Forbes magazine Chief Content Officer Randall Lane, Israel was a natural choice to host the first-ever Forbes Under 30 Global Women’s Summit, set to take place in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem from March 31 to April 4, 2019 with 600 participants from 50 countries.

It’s not only because participants rated last May’s first-ever Under 30 Global Summit in Israel as Forbes’ top event of the year, Lane tells ISRAEL21c.

Israel was chosen also because of its track record in making leadership roles available to women, starting in the military.

Read More: Israel21c

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Google Set to Acquire Israeli Cloud Start-Up Alooma

(Photo: Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)

(Photo: Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)

By Eytan Halon - February 20, 2019

Google intends to acquire Israeli data migration start-up Alooma, the companies announced late on Tuesday, in a deal said to be worth $150 million.

Google said that acquiring the company would be critical for building additional data migration capabilities as it seeks to capture a greater share of the cloud market, which is currently dominated by Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure.

Read More: Jerusalem Post

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Elon Musk's SpaceX Falcon 9 will be launching Israel's first mission to the Moon

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By Lorraine Lorenzo - February 21, 2019

SpaceX is set to launch the first privately funded mission to land on the Moon on Thursday, at 8:45 p.m. EST at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Elon Musk's space agency will be launching the Israeli robotic lunar lander, Beresheet, 30 minutes after the takeoff of its Falcon 9 rocket.

You can watch the live streaming of the SpaceX Falcon 9's launch of the Israeli Moon lander here.

Beresheet is the first Israeli lunar aircraft that was created through a joint venture of non-profit company SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries, the country's largest aerospace and defense company.

Read More: International Business Times

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This cheap, low-tech device could save you after a heart attack

(Photo: OHK Medical Devices)

(Photo: OHK Medical Devices)

By Abigail Klein Leichman - February 18, 2019

The 1940s inflatable anti-gravity suit kept fighter pilots from losing consciousness by preventing blood from pooling in their legs. That invention inspired medical anti-shock trousers used in the 1950s to 1970s to stabilize hemorrhagic shock patients by shifting blood from their legs to their core organs.

As a young medical officer in the Israel Defense Forces in the late 1970s, Dr. Noam Gavriely found several technical and logistical problems with anti-shock trousers: it took two people and a good few minutes to position them, and when they were removed the patient’s blood pressure took a dangerous dive.

Gavriely went on to become a serial medical-device inventor and emergency-care physician. His latest invention, HemaShock, accomplishes the same goal as anti-shock trousers but quickly and easily, without air pressure.

Read More: Israel21c

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10 Israeli companies scouring digital data to save our lives

(Photo: Metamorworks via Shutterstock.com)

(Photo: Metamorworks via Shutterstock.com)

By Brian Blum - February 11, 2019

Making sense of the vast amount of data stored in our medical records and coming from the growing number of medical devices we use at home or in the hospital is a hot area for technological advances.

Running artificial intelligence algorithms on health data collected via HMOs, wearable devices or hospitals can aid with diagnoses, suggest unexpected ailments and prevent fatal complications.

Israel has a cluster of startups doing exactly that. ISRAEL21c looks at 10 of the most promising.

1. MonitHer

Jerusalem-based startup MonitHer doesn’t have a website yet, but we suspect it won’t be long: The company, founded by American immigrant to Israel Yehudit Abrams, won the $360,000 grand prize at the WeWork Creator Awards in Jerusalem in June 2018.

Read More: Israel21c

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As Africa grapples with demographics on a grand scale, Israel is ready with its expertise

(Photo: GPO/Kobi Gideon)

(Photo: GPO/Kobi Gideon)

By Israel Kasnett - February 6, 2019

With its fast-growing population and enormous resources, Africa is poised to dominate the global conversation in the 21st century. Yet this vast continent is not without its equally large environmental and demographic challenges as it continues to rapidly develop.

“Things are changing dramatically in Africa. And Africa is an increasingly important continent for the future stability of the world. Africa is the largest exporter of human refugees and has enormous, awesome resources. For that reason, there has been a new scramble for influence in Africa,” Dore Gold, president of the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, told JNS.

And Israel, with its world-renowned expertise in areas such as technology, agriculture, water management and security, is poised to lend assistance to these African nations as they seek to grow.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s recent trip to Chad, during which the two countries re-established diplomatic ties, highlighted the enormous strides Israel has made in Africa. The trip also broke a record for the Jewish state. This is the first time in Israel’s history that, out of the 193 or so recognized countries in the world, Israel now has diplomatic relations with 160 of them. That is a solid diplomatic achievement, and it is one that Israel will continue to improve upon.

Read More: JNS.org

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